University of Florida IFAS Extension provides a great source for Greenhouse Vegetable Production

Summary – Florida Greenhouse Vegetable Production Handbook, Vol 11

G. J. Hochmuth2
It should be keenly apparent to the prospective greenhouse vegetable grower that some formidable difficulties exist. Greenhouse vegetable production involves much expense and a great amount of risk. During the decision process, the potential new grower must understand and decide if the risks are manageable.
The production of greenhouse vegetables involves dealing with specialty horticultural crops that have some exacting requirements. If the production phase of greenhouse vegetable culture can be characterized, it would certainly include the descriptors intensive, timely, managerial-dependent, detail specific, and expensive.
Greenhouse vegetable production, however, can potentially be a high-return enterprise. Along with the potential for high return, comes the potential for great losses because of the high level of risk involved with this enterprise. There are many factors that need to be thoroughly investigated prior to entering the business of greenhouse vegetables. Depending upon how well a greenhouse operator can identify and manage all of the variables, the operator may have a highly rewarding enterprise or a financially frustrating one. Hopefully, this publication will help keep the prospective grower from facing the latter option.
For growers who decide to pursue greenhouse construction and crop production, information on those topics is available in succeeding publications (volumes 2 and 3).

More Information

For more information on greenhouse crop production, please visit our website at http://nfrec-sv.ifas.ufl.edu.
For the other chapters in the Greenhouse Vegetable Production Handbook, see the documents listed below:

Florida Greenhouse Vegetable Production Handbook, Vol 1

Florida Greenhouse Vegetable Production Handbook, Vol 2

Florida Greenhouse Vegetable Production Handbook, Vol 3

Footnotes

1.
This document is HS773, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date December 1990. Revised January 2001. Reviewed February 2008. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.
2.
G.J. Hochmuth, professor of Horticultural Sciences and Center Director, North Florida Research and Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. The Florida Greenhouse Vegetable Production Handbook is edited by George Hochmuth, professor of Horticultural Sciences and Center Director, North Florida Research and Eduction Center and Robert Hochmuth, extension agent IV, North Florida Research and Education Center – Suwannee Valley, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611
You can visit http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/cv251 for additional details.

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2010 Commercial Horticulture Trade Show Schedule

Calendar of Events held in 2010

2010– Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Dates
Event
Topic
Venue
Country
2010 
January ’10
Event
Topic
Venue
Country
12-14 Jan
Sival Vine & Wine Angers France
13-14 Jan
Dan-Gar-Tek Gardening & Garden Equipment Odense Denmark
13-14 Jan
Agro-Mashov Agri-Horticulture Tel Aviv Israel
13-16 Jan
Agriflanders Agri-Horticulture Ghent Belgium
14-16 Jan
TPIE Tropical Flowers & Plants Ft Lauderdale USA
15-24 Jan
Intl Green Week Agri-Horticulture Berlin Germany
20-22 Jan
Mid-America Trade Show Horticulture Chicago USA
21-23 Jan
Viveralia Horticulture Alicante Spain
26-29 Jan
Horticulture Essen Germany
February ’10
Event
Topic
Venue
Country
2-4 Feb
AgriHort
Agri- Horticulture
Kiev Ukraine
3-6 Feb
Expo Agro Sinaloa
Agri- Horticulture
Culiacan Mexico
3-7 Feb
Agrotica
Agri- Horticulture
Thessaloniki Greece
3-7 Feb
Northwest Flower Show
Gardening
Seattle USA
3-5 Feb
Interagro
Agri- Horticulture
Kiev Ukraine
3-5 Feb
Fruit Logistica
Fruit packaging & transport
Berlin Germany
4-7 Feb
Fieragicola
Agri- Horticulture
Verona Italy
9-13 Feb
FIMA
Machinery
Zaragoza Spain
10-12 Feb
Landscape Industry
Landscaping
Moscow Russia
11-14 Feb
Pro-Horti
Horticultural Contracting
Poznan Poland
16-18 Feb
Horticulture
Angers France
19-21 Feb
Flormart
Horticulture
Padova Italy
19-21 Feb
Fruchtwelt Bodensee
Fruit
Friedricshafen Netherlands
23-26 Feb
Landscape & Garden
Horticulture
Kiev Ukraine
23-27 Feb
Agra
Agri- Horticulture
Plovdiv Bulgaria
24-28 Feb
Holland Flowers Festival
Floriculture
Bovenkarspel Spain
26-28 Feb
Gardenia
Horticulture
Poznan Poland
28 Feb
Floriga
Horticulture
Leipzig Germany
March ’10
2-3 Mar
Florall Floriculture Ghent Belgium
2-5 Mar
Smagua Water Zaragoza Spain
3-7 Mar
Agro Agriculture Braga Portugal
3-9 Mar
Garten Munchen Horticulture Munich Germany
3-6 Mar
Intl Agricultural Fair Agri- Horticulture Mersin Turkey
6-14 Mar
Ortogiardino Horticulture Pordenone Italy
8-10 Mar
Horticulture Dubai UAE
9-11 Mar
World Floral Expo Floriculture Miami USA
11-14 Mar
Expojardim Horticulture Batalha Portugal
12-14 Mar
Agrotech Agriculture Kieice Poland
17-19 Mar
Horticulture Nairobi Kenya
17-21 Mar
Giardina Gardening Zurich Switzerland
18-20 Mar
Freshantalya Horticulture Antalta Turkey
19-21 Mar
Hortikultura Horticulture Belgrade Serbia
19-21 Mar
Flora Horticulture Celje Slovenia
21-25 Mar
Techagro Agri- Horticulture Brno Czech Rep.
24-28 Mar
San Fransisco Flower & Garden Retail Horticulture San Fransisco USA
24-28 Mar
Flower (spring) Horticulture Plovdiv Bulgaria
26-28 Mar
Gardenex & Growtech
Horticulture
Johannesburg South Africa
29-31 Mar
AGRAme Agri- Horticulture Dubai UAE
30 Mar-
2 Apr
Swasana Agri- Horticulture Amman Jordan
April ’10
Event
Topic
Venue
Country
8-11 Apr
Hortiflowers
Floriculture
Almaty Kazakhstan
14-16 Apr
Flowers & Hortec Ukraine
Horticulture
Kiev Ukraine
14-17 Apr
Hortiflorexpo
Horticulture
Shanghai China
15-18 Apr
Riga Agro
Agri- Horticulture
Riga Latvia
17-25 Apr
Cincinnati Flower & Garden Show
Horticulture
Cincinatti USA
May ’10
1-5 May
Sitevi Mercosur Horticulture Mendoza Argentina
4-6 May
National Hardware Show Horticulture Las Vegas USA
18-20 May
Journees des Colections Horticulture Senlis France
18-21 May
Nampo Agri- Horticulture Bothaville South Africa
21-24 May
Das Furstiche Gartenfest Horticulture Fulda Germany
30 May-2 Jun
Iran Agro Agri- Horticulture Tehran Iran
June ’10
Event
Topic
Venue
Country
8-10 Jun
Intl Australia Show Agri- Horticulture Swan Hill Australia
10-12 Jun
Agritex Agri- Horticulture Damascus Syria
16-18 Jun
Hortitec Horticulture Sao Paulo Brazil
15-19 Jun
Agro Kiev Agri- Horticulture Kiev Ukraine
22-25 Jun
Super Floral Show Floriculture Miami Beach USA
30 Jun-2 Jul
Oga Horticulture Koppigen Switzerland
July ’10
10-13 Jul
Ohio Short Course Horticulture Columbus USA
August ’10
Event
Topic
Venue
Country
5-7 Aug
SNA Horticulture Atlanta USA
11-14 Aug
Sibflower Horticulture Novosibirsk Russia
17-19 Aug
Independent Garden Centre Show Horticulture Chicago USA
19-22 Aug
Agrokomplex Agri- Horticulture Ufa Russia
25-28 Aug
Plantarium Horticulture Boskoop Netherlands
September ’10
6-8 Sep
Spoga
Horticulture
Koln Germany
7-9 Sep
Innovi-Agri
Agri- Horticulture
Ondes France
8-10 Sep
Asia Fruit Logistica
Horticulture
Hong Kong China
13-16 Sep
Polagra Food
Food & Food Processing
Poznan Poland
15-18 Sep
Galabau
Urban Greenspace
Nuremburg Germany
22-25 Sep
Florecuador
Floriculture
Quito Ecuador
23-25 Sep
The Landscape Show
Horticulture
Orlando USA
23-26 Sep
Fiaflora
Floriculture
Sao Paulo Brazil
October ’10
Event
Topic
Venue
Country
TBA Oct
Horticulture
Amsterdam Netherlands
7-11 Oct
Hortikomlex Horticulture Olomouc Czech Republic
November ’10
4-6 Nov
Interpoma
Fruit
Bolzano Italy
10-14 Nov
Eima
Agri- Horticulture
Bologna Italy
December ’10
Event
Topic
Venue
Country
5-7 Dec
Irrigation Show
Irrigation
Anaheim USA
TBA
Horticulture
Antalya Turkey

Orginized by:
http://www.cha-hort.com/index.htm

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Food security, safety and availability!

More Households Request Food Aid

The U.S. Agriculture Department said Monday the number of households that reported struggling to buy enough food in 2008 jumped 31% over the previous year.According to the USDA’s annual poll, 17 million U.S. households reported some degree of food insecurity in 2008, up from 13 million households in 2007.

Associated PressFood banks are seeing a jump in people needing help, a survey says.

“It is time for America to get very serious about food security and hunger,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, who is pressing Congress to expand such programs as food stamps and free school lunches that consume roughly 70% of his department’s budget.Comparable numbers for 2009 aren’t available yet. Officials with organizations involved in feeding the hungry say the survey results square with growing demand at food pantries: the number of people seeking help this summer is up an average of 30% from the summer of 2008, according to a recent survey of food banks by Feeding America, a food-bank network.The 2008 survey results suggest that almost 15% of U.S. households had trouble putting enough food on their tables, up from 11% in 2007; the proportion is the highest detected by the survey since it began in 1995. Put another way, about 49 million people, including about 17 million children, worried last year about getting enough to eat.Maura Daly, vice president of government relations for Feeding America, said 90% of food banks in the recent survey reported that, according to anecdotal evidence, unemployment is the leading factor for the increased demand.

[Food Crisis chart]

U.S. consumers in 2008 also saw a sudden acceleration in the cost of food. While the food inflation rate has stalled this year, some economists are worried that the move by many recession-weary farmers to cut production might ignite grocery prices again next year.The global recession is helping swell the number of hungry people around the world to the highest levels since the early 1970s.But the way USDA economists measure food worries in the U.S. is far more liberal than their gauge for other nations, where people are labeled food insecure only if they consume fewer than 2,100 calories a day. Few of the U.S. households labeled as food insecure by the USDA have it that tough.Instead, the USDA’s domestic survey tries to quantify the number of households that have difficulty providing enough food at some time during the year. Many of these families are able to avoid hunger by participating in such federal nutrition programs as food stamps, or by having their children participate in a free school-lunch program.Still, the USDA survey indicates that someone in about one-third of food-insecure households experienced some hunger or came very close to it in 2008. In these households with very low food security, food consumption fell and normal eating patterns were disrupted.According to the survey, 6.7 million U.S. households had very low food security in 2008, up 43% from 4.7 million households in 2007.